What Would Make Your Commute Better?

Jeff Bezos' $250 million purchase of The Washington Post in 2014 changed the direction of the newspaper in some fairly significant ways. Among them: The Posts's focus became less local and more global, it began expanding digital access dramatically (promoted by the Kindle, of course), and started spending some serious cash on events. One of these events is the America Answers series. Begun in …

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Uber’s Plan for Self-Driving Cars Will Make its Taxi Disruption Look Quaint by Comparison

[By Paul Goddin for Mobility Lab. Reprinted by GovTech.] Uber has fundamentally changed the taxi industry. But its biggest disruption may be yet to come. The ride-hailing company has invested in autonomous-vehicle research, and its CEO Travis Kalanick (pictured above) has indicated that consumers can expect a driverless Uber fleet by 2030. Uber expects its service …

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When ‘To Protect and Serve’ Becomes ‘To Shame and Ridicule’

The disparity between the "haves" and "have nots" is perhaps nowhere more striking than in New York City. One end of the economic spectrum is best symbolized by the array of new condominium skyscrapers reshaping the city's skyline (top price, $95 million). Pan down 1,000 feet or so, and the economics shift just as precipitously. At …

Continue reading When ‘To Protect and Serve’ Becomes ‘To Shame and Ridicule’

Washington D.C.'s recent renaissance probably doesn't include the Dupont Circle neighborhood. Dupont has been an attractive place to live since the 1970s, when the neighborhood (in decline after World War II and the 1968 riots) was revitalized by gay and lesbian urban pioneers. Along with other neighborhoods like West Hollywood, Chicago's Boystown, and Greenwich Village, Dupont Circle became …

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New Research Reveals the Cost of Sprawl to Municipal Coffers

[By Paul Goddin for Mobility Lab] Ever since the Roman Empire, local governments have had great control over land use. Today, this control is exerted through zoning regulations, tax policies, and infrastructure-investment decisions. Municipalities can choose to develop in an unconnected, low-density, suburban-style manner, or they can consider more compact, connected urban land uses. These …

Continue reading New Research Reveals the Cost of Sprawl to Municipal Coffers

Washington D.C.'s Union Station, in addition to being a major train hub and leisure destination, is the busiest Metrorail station in Washington's system. Customers may exit directly to the Amtrak and MARC train platforms, or, as pictured here, onto street level in front of the station's entrance. Trivia: This shot of Union Station can be seen at the beginning of …

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