What Have You Been Doing Lately?

As far as jobs go, I've been slumming it the past year working as an office manager/ paralegal for a small law office in Dupont Circle. I work 30 hours a week and my commute is a seven-minute walk, so I've been spoiled in some respects. I've learned the ins and outs of bankruptcy law, …

Continue reading What Have You Been Doing Lately?

Advertisements

An Appreciation of Popularity

The correlation between popularity and quality is tenuous at best. How often have excellent products died in the marketplace, while competing products of lesser quality have succeeded (I'm thinking Betamax, Kodak, and TiVo, to name a few)? How often, too, have movie stars achieved enormous popular success despite possessing little in the way of acting ability (my apologies to Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone)? Popularity isn't …

Continue reading An Appreciation of Popularity

It’s a Feature, Not a Bug: Inequality in Liberal Cities

At the November 10, 2015 Republican presidential debate, candidate Rand Paul said that inequality in cities -- the gap between the rich and poor -- "seems to be worst in cities run by Democrats." His comment received rousing applause from the audience, and much media attention. To be fair, Paul got the data right (for …

Continue reading It’s a Feature, Not a Bug: Inequality in Liberal Cities

Walkability and Transit Mean Independence in Golden Years

Most adults want to age in place; that is, grow older without the need to move from their home or community. As driving becomes a challenge, though, seniors can feel dependent upon others, or isolated and cut off from their friends or public services. Communities that have strong public transit systems and walkable amenities are …

Continue reading Walkability and Transit Mean Independence in Golden Years

Energizing People to Reimagine Our Cities

I'm not the creator of the embedded video in this post, but I worked at Mobility Lab during the period in which it was created, a golden period in Arlington County in which bike-sharing and active transportation really took off. Arlington, quite famously, moves people instead of cars.

American Cities’ Biggest Transportation Innovation is Decidedly Low-Tech

[By Paul Goddin for Mobility Lab] American cities are adding bus and bike lanes, implementing bikeshare systems, and creating public plazas and miniature parks at a rapid pace. Urban streets, long the domain of automobiles, are increasingly being reclaimed by and for the people, a change that amounts to the biggest transportation innovation in recent …

Continue reading American Cities’ Biggest Transportation Innovation is Decidedly Low-Tech

Transit’s Surprising Advantage is Sitting Right in Your Pocket

[By Paul Goddin for Mobility Lab. Edited for this site.] With public-transit use riding a 58-year high of 10.8 billion trips last year, it only makes sense to ask: why? Technology may be partially responsible for public transit's record ridership, but probably not in the way you think. As smartphones and other electronic devices have skyrocketed in popularity, more …

Continue reading Transit’s Surprising Advantage is Sitting Right in Your Pocket