The Unlikely Case of the Brick-and-Mortar Store with Lower Prices than Amazon

Photo by Elvert Barnes. Americans’ Amazon Love Story. Americans love Amazon, and have demonstrated this affection with their wallets, making the Seattle-based online superstore extremely profitable. Each year, in fact, Amazon gets bigger relative to other online retailers, as consumers award it a larger share of their total online shopping budget. This means that each year, Amazon amasses …

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Five Things Apple Got Wrong with the iPhone X (and How to Fix Them)

Photo of the iPhone X by the author, Paul Goddin. Cupertino, We Have a Problem — Actually, Make That Five. Prior to its launch, the iPhone X was being called “the most highly-anticipated version” of the phone to date, and with good reason. Almost two years before the iPhone X’s release, back when people still called it an iPhone …

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An Appreciation of Popularity

Crowd photo by Paul Devoto The correlation between popularity and quality is tenuous at best. How often have excellent products died in the marketplace, while competing products of lesser quality have succeeded (I'm thinking Betamax, Kodak, and TiVo, to name a few)? How often, too, have movie stars achieved enormous popular success despite possessing little in the way of acting ability (my apologies to Arnold Schwarzenegger …

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It’s a Feature, Not a Bug: Inequality in Liberal Cities

Nov. 10, 2015 Republican Presidential Debate At the November 10, 2015 Republican presidential debate, candidate Rand Paul said that inequality in cities -- the gap between the rich and poor -- "seems to be worst in cities run by Democrats." His comment received rousing applause from the audience, and much media attention. To be fair, …

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Transit-accessible Dupont Circle

Walkability and Transit Mean Independence in Golden Years

Transit-accessible Dupont Circle. Photo by the author. Most adults want to age in place; that is, grow older without the need to move from their home or community. As driving becomes a challenge, though, seniors can feel dependent upon others, or isolated and cut off from their friends or public services. Communities that have strong …

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Energizing People to Reimagine Our Cities

I'm not the creator of the embedded video in this post, but I worked at Mobility Lab during the period in which it was created, a golden period in Arlington County in which bike-sharing and active transportation really took off. Arlington, quite famously, moves people instead of cars. https://youtu.be/3SO97RBELmc

American Cities’ Biggest Transportation Innovation is Decidedly Low-Tech

[By Paul Goddin for Mobility Lab] American cities are adding bus and bike lanes, implementing bikeshare systems, and creating public plazas and miniature parks at a rapid pace. Urban streets, long the domain of automobiles, are increasingly being reclaimed by and for the people, a change that amounts to the biggest transportation innovation in recent …

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